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Thread: TF300T Repair: Parts and labour - time and money

  1. #1
    Soundwave
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    Question TF300T Repair: Parts and labour - time and money

    I've sent out a TF300T to replace a touch screen (not the LCD, just the touch glass) a while back Mid may. A few days later I got an email with their expert diagnostics (your touch panel is cracked). Later, I traded emails with them to ensure how long it would take to repair, and exactly how payment could be made. They issued an invoice that I paid on the 29th of May. Fast-forward 13 days and I have once again asked them when would the device be repaired. They have now given me a second unclear answer stating that they did not have the part in inventory and had to order it, but it did not arrive this weekend... (?)

    This "we do not have stock for that part" sounds awfully like they only repair "on consignment", ie: they only order the parts one-by-one from their source as the damaged devices reach their shop. This means expensive parts and amazingly slow turnaround on repairs... This is ASUS Iberia handling the case, and the device is being repaired in the Czech Republic.

    I'm a long time Asus consumer and I'd never have bought a tablet at this stage except from Asus. Luckily I've never needed Asus' RMA any time.

    I just really want to know what the average time for a repair of this sort is and whether I should begin getting miffed or not...

    BTW: I'd also like to know how much other users are being charged for parts. I have just been charged > 182 for a touch panel (parts+labour) which in my book reads as a rip-off. I also hear a lot about users getting their kit repaired in less than a fortnight, but I'm yet to have a clear idea about when the repair will actually take place.

    Please share your experiences

    Touch panel replacement cost: ~ 182

  2. #2
    Asus USA Social Media Team
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    Here in the US, repair turnaround time is about a 7-10 day average, not including travel time. This can change, of course; but I would say average time I see is 7 - 10 days. All repair parts are ordered from HQ. However, each repair facility does have an inventory of parts for repair. It's not unusual for a specific part to run out. Considering everything comes from HQ, delivery time can take a while. We do see this happen in the US too, and it's up to our service centers to make sure everything is in stock and ready. Things do happen, and all the forecasting in the world might not help if there was a sudden influx of an issue that required the same part. The digitizer/LCD combo is one of our main repair parts, after all.

    I do apologize for your experience thus far, though. The digitizer/lcd replacement is a straight swap, so it shouldn't take long as soon as the part comes in.
    Asus USA is a social support channel for North American purchasers. UK users requiring warranty support should contact their retailer. For other geographic locations, please check your product documentation or the Asus website for your locality and follow the support section instructions.




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  3. #3
    Soundwave
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    Thanks mate,

    My user experience with the tablet so far has been great (except I think the difference in pricing from the wifi to the 3G version is notoriously high - €100, here in Europe) and 3G would've come in really handy for me.

    However, my opinion of ASUS service has now gone down the drain. I dropped the equivalent of 243 US Dollars to have the digitizer on my tablet replaced. Needless to say I do not feel happy about the price. I could have done the job myself by ordering an original digitizer for 69 from a supplier in the UK, yet felt that I would jeopardize the remainder of the warranty... now, not only is the most common replacement part out of stock, the repair service is unable to provide me with a guesstimate as to when I can have my tablet back.

    I just tracked down a couple of online promotions where I can buy a TF300T from a store RIGHT NOW for $230. I am FURIOUS. How lame is it that replacing a simple digitizer is more expensive than buying an entire manufacturer refurbished TF300T?

    Seriously? $243 for a digitizer?

    Never buying an ASUS tablet again.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by pauldavidtaylor View Post
    Thanks mate,

    My user experience with the tablet so far has been great (except I think the difference in pricing from the wifi to the 3G version is notoriously high - 100, here in Europe) and 3G would've come in really handy for me.

    However, my opinion of ASUS service has now gone down the drain. I dropped the equivalent of 243 US Dollars to have the digitizer on my tablet replaced. Needless to say I do not feel happy about the price. I could have done the job myself by ordering an original digitizer for 69 from a supplier in the UK, yet felt that I would jeopardize the remainder of the warranty... now, not only is the most common replacement part out of stock, the repair service is unable to provide me with a guesstimate as to when I can have my tablet back.

    I just tracked down a couple of online promotions where I can buy a TF300T from a store RIGHT NOW for $230. I am FURIOUS. How lame is it that replacing a simple digitizer is more expensive than buying an entire manufacturer refurbished TF300T?

    Seriously? $243 for a digitizer?

    Never buying an ASUS tablet again.
    I hear you Paul, but I have to say I also hear violins playing in the background. I have owned five Asus computers, and I have never taken the time to register one of them. If one fails I will simply take my loss. So far not one of those five Asus products (including a TF201 and a TF700) have failed or needed repair. You should have inquired as to the cost of repairing the TF300, and then considered whether it was advisable to fix it yourself or of simply updating your computer to a newer model. I hear you Paul, but I truthfully haven't too much sympathy.


    Sent from my ASUS Transformer Pad TF700T using Tapatalk HD

  5. #5
    Starscream
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    Repairs are always more expensive than new production: -

    i) In a repair facility you have to track individual units for return to their specific owners, in production the units are fungible.

    ii) In repair you have to take time to verify warranty entitlement and bill for out of warranty repairs.

    iii) The capacity and utilization of a production facility can be accurately modeled, a repair facility is driven by random events, so you have expensive test kit and people running at less than optimum capacity.

    iv) A production line worker typically does a single task and requires minimal training - a repair technician is a different (and considerably more expensive) animal entirely.

    v) Parts shipped from producer to assembler by the container load are going to be a lot cheaper to source, handle and track than the much smaller quantities needed in a repair centre - and even if you do supply your repair centres by shipping from the bulk deliveries to your manufacturing facility, that's double handling, which adds to the cost.

    Those are just a few of the obvious reasons I can think of at the moment.
    Swipe likes this.

  6. #6
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    MikeS is absolutely right. These days it's more expensive to fix than to produce. It's non-intuitive, and quite annoying, but not much that can be done about it, except going back to the way of the old days.. and then a thing like a tablet would cost as much as a good car. Fixing a digitizer for $243 wouldn't look that expensive then.

    I remember a time when someone wrote in one of the computer magazines something that went like this: "The computer I want will always cost $4000". And that was true.. for years and years. As computers got faster and better the one you wanted was always out of reach. Once I decided that I would get what I wanted: The very best. So I got a PC AT-compatible computer (still had to go for a Taiwan clone, from what later became Acer. The original was just too expensive) with an 8MHz 286 CPU, 1MB of RAM, and a 40MB harddisk, and EGA graphics. Cost me something like $4000, true enough.. and that was in 1987! (A pizza was around $2.50 in 1988 - I just looked it up.) And after three months the disk was full and it was already starting to become obsolete. The year after I gave it away, to someone in Eastern Europe. $4000 in 1987 money down the drain. Of course at that time there was a new must-have CPU/Memory/Disk combo which was what everyone wanted, and it also cost $4000 (there were always the cheaper 'home' computers, but to me they were never really satisfactory).

    It wasn't until well into the 21th century, I would say less than a decade ago that prices for incredibly impressive and generally good quality computer tech went down to the, believe it or not, unbelievably cheap prices that we enjoy today.
    The cost for that is that it'll be expensive to repair, not the least because the cost of people actually working has just kept going up. Yesterday I and a colleague "wasted" four hours setting up a new server at work - the cost for the company (for work that can't be billed to a customer) is pretty much exactly what a brand new TF700T with dock costs around here. So that's not how we're supposed to do it - someone else should have done that, not us.

    -Tor

  7. #7
    Soundwave
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    overall replies

    Quote Originally Posted by IdaUte View Post
    I hear you Paul, but I have to say I also hear violins playing in the background. I have owned five Asus computers, and I have never taken the time to register one of them. If one fails I will simply take my loss. So far not one of those five Asus products (including a TF201 and a TF700) have failed or needed repair. You should have inquired as to the cost of repairing the TF300, and then considered whether it was advisable to fix it yourself or of simply updating your computer to a newer model. I hear you Paul, but I truthfully haven't too much sympathy.


    Sent from my ASUS Transformer Pad TF700T using Tapatalk HD
    It seems you are also underestimating my intelligence - probably on account of the number of posts I have and by totally disregarding anything about me because you don't know me from jack. If you live by a standard where you "take a loss" instead of having a device repaired, I'm sorry for you. That must translate really well into real life.

    It's the fact that a component turns out to be as expensive as the whole device that will keep me away from ASUS products because I've heard time and again support was utterly rubbish but never experienced it first hand (from ASUS). I've had more PCs than you can probably imagine and I build my own, component by component... My issue is that replies from ASUS support in Europe are vague and borderline idiotic. I got more info in one single reply from ASUS USA on this forum, than on the 10 emails that simply ignored my most basic questions as to pricing and repair time. The replies from ASUS Iberia have been clearly given to not provide a deadline and to give the support centre some margin to operate "loosely".

    And here's a bit of relevant info: When I was presented with the repair quote, I was told that if I refused the repair, they would charge me 46+ handling from the Czech Republic to have it returned to me untouched. There are no violins here, matey, there's just a deep resounding feeling that it's a rip-off... and it is. Total, this added up to $100 just to return it to me with a diagnostic I made myself. So... weighing in my options: pay $100 for nothing, or pay $240+ to have it repaired. Wow, great options, right?

    "Taking a loss" is not an option in my world, nor for anyone I know that has a bit of a brain.

    On the other hand, I totally understand where Tor and MikeS are getting at, my first PC cost me close to $2500 in a time where $2500 was about half your yearly income. But then again, computers took 30 years to "commoditise" while tablets took what...? 2? (I'm excluding the original Microsoft/Fujitsu Stylistic tablets in the 90s, as it was a sort of misfire on the tablet concept). Tablets are cheap because their components have become cheap (greatly due to Apple, imo, because it triggered the competition response and a commoditisation effect for smartphone components).

    I'll give you a better example still. Hard-drive manufacturers (and no, they do not manufacture all their components, they have to source most of mechanical bits outside their own area of expertise). For years these guys have had to cope with:

    a) sourcing components cheap and to a high-spec of reliability;
    b) keeping inventory set aside for RMAs and warranty coverage;
    c) investing heavily in R&D and keeping up with market demand for bigger and more reliable drives;
    d) surviving in a highly competitive market of severely diminishing returns.

    They struggled to keep their margins and failed miserably, and if not for natural disasters, the TB of storage capacity would be now around $25, instead of the $50 you currently see... Yet, if my HDD breaks down and I need to have it replaced, there is stock. They are required by law to maintain a percentage of parts in stock for replacement. Of course they find it easier to replace the entire drive than to service a single component, but then they send the old drive back to the factory, refurbish it and resell it at - surely - a better price than the individual component would make them. Refurbished drives are still under warranty and HDD makers are confident enough in their refurbished stock that they have the same standard of service for both new and refurbished ones. Kudos to the HDD industry, I say. You might go haywire when your drive breaks down - it's happened to me a couple of times - but I've never had any issues with the replacement or repair (I'm obviously not talking about backing up data).

    Like I said in the original post, what it sounds like is that the repair centre keeps no stock at all and only orders in parts as repairs come up. This is not the right way to operate a support centre (which itself does not belong to ASUS, but outsourced to a company in the Czech Republic), and I'm sure if ASUS were to audit the customer satisfaction levels and the inventory these guys keep, it would come across some severe deficiencies... or not, it might be within ASUS business requirements for an outsourced repair service.

    Here's another thought: I've ALWAYS been an anti-Apple guy... the artsy-fartsy & holier-than-thou attitude that Apple fanboys (&girls) have, based on the presumption of product/design superiority, is too much for me, but truth be said, most of my friends carry around Apple products and when they break down, all they do is replace them with the warranty or with the AppleCare pack, which costs them next to nothing (if we weigh in the cost of the product, it's "apparent" value and the fact that it's an annual "insurance"), and Apple has 48 hours to replace the device. Period. 48 hours. And they do it. I don't mention Samsung, or Microsoft, or any other tablet brand because I have no personal experience with their support, but I've helped many Apple addicts "cope with their loss" and explained what AppleCare really meant... so I'm using it as an example.

    What no-one mentions is that while it takes a PC company 9-12 months to refresh their product line-up, as it is usually in sync with Intel or AMD CPU launches or seasonal opportunities (ie: back to school), tablets are in a state of constant refresh. Product lifecycle roadmaps went out the window. Companies are getting products out furiously to try and upstage the competition and when they do stick to a plan (ie: Apple again), their products launch and are immediately "outdated". How long does a tablet product take until it goes into "sales"? Very little. Why? Because the next big thing is just around the corner. And what does that mean to the consumer? No long term support for their products.

    I think companies like ASUS, LG, Samsung, etc... must look better at customer response to their own policies. That's all.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pauldavidtaylor View Post
    [..]the repair centre keeps no stock at all and only orders in parts as repairs come up. This is not the right way to operate a support centre [..]
    Can't argue with that. It's unacceptable.

    As for product lifetime, even though Asus come out with new products as fast as anyone else, it looks to me like they use a lot of the same components and parts for new products. Look at Intel/Windows notebooks, and tablets, and you'll notice how many of these products share a lot of the same design.. the keyboard looks exactly the same between some of them, for example. There's definitely at least one PC-type Asus netbook with something that looks just like my TF201 dock keyboard. It may not be the dock, exactly, but the keyboard part must be the exact same component (and of course my new TF700 can use the old TF201 keyboard dock just fine). And it's not only keys, keyboards and membranes I suspect. What that tells me is that a repair facility won't have to stock separate parts for all of the Asus models - there must be quite a number of internal components common between models.

    -Tor

  9. #9
    Soundwave
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    I've gotta say that in the case of the digitizer there are at least three different models for the TF300T and they are not interchangeable. I would need to match the exact component to my TF300T P/N. But I know what you're saying, of course they don't stock each and every component available, but for argument's sake, let's assume that digitizers are probably the *most* common damaged component in these devices... right? Anyhow, it might just be bad luck for me.

    As of 16 days after payment, the repair centre does not have an estimated repair time for me, nor do they reply to direct questions like "when do you expect the Tablet to be repaired?" When I ask this, they have replied anything from "the replacement part did not arrive in the last shipment of materials, so we are waiting for the next one" to "once the part arrives, the device will be repaired, tested and shipped back to you", always failing to mention a time frame.

    Every time they have replied, I have informed them they did not address my main concern which is the "when" considering the "how much" was already taken care of.

    I've worked tech support. I know when someone is giving a client a run-around and I avoided doing it because I wouldn't like to be on the other side of the line. Being straightforward and upfront about things is a big plus in my book and clients appreciate it a bit of honesty than throwing muck in your face.

    Thanks for all your feedback, feet are firmly grounded and bracing for the next ASUS Support reply.

  10. #10
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    If they still haven't fixed it yet, just cancel the whole thing and buy a new tablet.. you can get a TF300 for around $250 or less..

    There really isn't any normal answer for the behavior Asus is exhibiting.... Unless they suddenly got crushed with thousands of repairs.. which I doubt.

 

 
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