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Thread: Buy new or refurbished?

  1. #31
    Soundwave
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swipe View Post
    I would not buy a refurbished device if a new one was only $50 more. But it's your choice.
    Yes, I've come to this decision also. And as a reminder to all, many of your credit cards double the warranty up to a year, so that would men 2 years on a new unit. - though I can't remember the last portable device I've had that long before upgrading.

  2. #32
    Shockwave
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swipe View Post
    I would not buy a refurbished device if a new one was only $50 more. But it's your choice.
    I just wanted to add, along with cost savings there are actually some benefits in purchasing a refurbished device.

    I think this is what supersheep was trying to say in this statement.

    Quote Originally Posted by supersheep View Post
    I think you should buy a refurbished tablet. Why? Because we can save money and refurbished is only was have misstake and was fixed by manufacturers, it's good after fixed and noproblem. You should chooice tablet with 500GB dock version, it's will best.
    So let me start off by saying, I work for a company that manufacturers electronic devices and am somewhat familiar with "re-manufactured" and "refurbished" processes.

    The great thing about manufacturing processes when building electronic devices, is that there is a lot of consistency between the devices that get built. The bad thing about manufacturing processes when building electronic devices, is that there is a lot of consistency between the devices that get built.

    In other words, if everything is going well in the manufacturing processes as well as the individual components that also go through their own manufacturing processes then the consistency of building a good quality reliable product becomes a consistent thing in the manufacturing process. However, often is the case as time passes latent failures due to that consistent manufacturing process may start to be discovered. As they're found, improvements to the manufacturing process start to occur to prevent these types of latent failures.

    The way manufacturer "warranty" works is that there is a dedicated warranty department that receives warranty return parts. Analysis is done by these warranty departments and eventually they start seeing "common" types of failures being received through warranty returns. The warranty department does their analysis and feeds back their findings to manufacturing and then manufacturing makes some type of improvement change to their manufacturing process to eliminate these particular types of failures. The warranty lab also has "rework" stations setup, where these common types of failures are fixed after the analysis is complete. After rework is completed, the parts then go through the same end of line tests that were originally done in the manufacturing process. These parts are no longer considered "new" and can't be sold as such and get the label "re-manufactured" or "refurbished". Thus, they're the same parts as the new ones and have gone through the same functionality inspection checks as the new parts, but have now been fixed of the latent failure condition that may have been due to the consistent manufacturing process.

    This entire process is a way company's reduce the impact of warranty return costs. As a over simplified example, let's say it costs Asus $200 to build a T100 and typical retail price is $350. So they make $150 on each sale of a T100. When they receive a warranty return it has now cost them $200 for the returned device and it cost them an additional $200 to send the replacement device back to the person that originally bought the returned device. Making a total warranty cost net loss to Asus of $50 ($350 purchase price -$200 returned device loss -$200 replacement device cost ). However if they can turn around and sell the returned device for $300 instead of $350 (ie $100 profit instead of $150) their net loss due to warranty return now becomes a net profit of $250 ($350 +$100 -$200).

    So it is quite possible that you can buy a "new" device which has gone through the exact same original manufacturing process as a device that was a warranty return that has now been fixed of that manufacturing latent problem. The difference is that the new device may eventually have the same failure condition that the refurbished device originally had and was returned through warranty, but the refurbished device has now been fixed of that latent failure condition.

    I'm therefore a big fan of purchasing "refurbished" or "re-manufactured" devices. As well as getting a reduced price, I have an additional confidence that the device I purchased may have been fixed of a latent failure condition.

    Here's a personal experiences of mine with this.

    I purchased (2) 55" LED 3D Samsung TVs, exact same model from the same retail store. One of them was brand new and the other I bought 2 months later was "refurbished" and cost me $350 less than the "new" one. There was a 2 year manufacturers Warranty on both TVs.

    After owning the new TV, 2 months just passed 2 years, one day I went to turn on the TV and no picture, there was sound but was presented with a black screen. I did some research on the web to see if I could find out if other people have experienced the same problem and what they may have done to fix it. I come to find some people had experienced the same problem after owning the same TV after 1 month, 6 months, and 1+ years. Some described how they had to have the TV serviced, where a tech replaced the TV's main motherboard and it cost them $600 to have this done because they were out of warranty. All this research told me there was most likely a common latent problem that existed on my particular model Samsung TVs. Being just out of warranty I was upset that I may now have to spend $600 to get my TV fixed, but ended up contacting Samsung's warranty department and described the problem I experienced and pointed out to them, that this seems to be a "common" warranty problem and directed them to the Cnet discussions where I had read about others describing the exact same problem. I told them nothing about "most likely needed to have the main board replaced." Samsung took care of me, despite being out of warranty by 2 months. They sent an authorized service tech to my house within a week and the tech walked into my house with a replacement part in hand......a main motherboard. Now how did the tech know what was wrong with my TV without even looking at it 1st? He took my TV apart and replaced the main board and my TV was now working again. The way he knew is that Samsung had obviously had previous warranty returns with the same problem I described, and they had already analyzed the problem in their warranty analysis and I'm sure by now had fixed the problem that existed on their main motherboard.

    I have now owned both TVs for over 4 years....I never had the same problem from the TV I purchased that was "refurbished". Is that because the refurbished TV may have had the same motherboard problem and was fixed in the refurb/re-manufacturing process? It is very well possible. Alls I know is that the "new" TV had the problem after 2 years, and the exact same refurbished TV has never had the same problem after 4 years and both TVs were purchased around the same time.
    Last edited by Rednroll; 06-20-2014 at 06:16 AM.
    vagabond likes this.

  3. #33
    rscheller
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    I have now owned both TVs for over 4 years....I never had the same problem from the TV I purchased that was "refurbished". Is that because the refurbished TV may have had the same motherboard problem and was fixed in the refurb/re-manufacturing process? It is very well possible. Alls I know is that the "new" TV had the problem after 2 years, and the exact same refurbished TV has never had the same problem after 4 years and both TVs were purchased around the same time.
    As Forrest Gump said "life is laike a box a choc-o-lates... you never know what you're gonna git."

  4. #34
    Soundwave
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    While I've decided on new, this kind of was my first point. That a refurbished unit often has been screened better than when it was new.

  5. #35
    Jazz
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    One other thing is most likely at some point the warranty issue will be fixed in actual production, so the new "new" laptops should be fine as well. Just depends on when they found the common issue and how fast the could fix it in the manufacturing process. Also most likely some percentage of the old "new" laptops will never have the same issue. Most often x% of parts fail usually not 100%.

  6. #36
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    A couple of years ago an Asus exec said the failure rate was around 1%.

  7. #37
    Shockwave
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swipe View Post
    A couple of years ago an Asus exec said the failure rate was around 1%.
    That's actually a pretty high quantity. When warranty folks usually talk about failure rates they talk in either "C/1000" (Returns per 1000) or "PPM" Parts Per Million, where a decent failure rate is usually in the 500 PPM scorecard range....or 500 returns per 1 Million parts made. A 1% return rate is 10,000 PPM. I can tell you if my company's customers were seeing 10K PPM scores from us, they would be throwing fits but then again, I work in the automotive industry and supply components to car manufacturers such as Toyota, Lexus, Mercedes and BMW.

    Also when you make electronic products which are on the leading edge of the technology curve, things do tend to run a bit higher on the PPM scale.

  8. #38
    Soundwave
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    My only gripe about my recent newegg refurb is that Asus wiped the hard drive clean during the refurbishment, so the unit arrived sans recovery partition. Now I would have deleted it myself after creating a USB recovery drive, but now I have a few hoops to jump through to get that warm, fuzzy, safe backup feeling. But, less than $200 for this unit makes hoop jumping less stressful, and the unit seems pristine to me.

  9. #39
    Ratchet
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    the only reason i wouldnt want a refurb is because the battery could already have lost some of its youth.
    my units only 4 months old and i get a solid 9 hours battery with light webbrowsing and brightness around 80%

    never got the 11 hours as advertised

  10. #40
    rscheller
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    Quote Originally Posted by lnrrgb View Post
    My only gripe about my recent newegg refurb is that Asus wiped the hard drive clean during the refurbishment, so the unit arrived sans recovery partition. Now I would have deleted it myself after creating a USB recovery drive, but now I have a few hoops to jump through to get that warm, fuzzy, safe backup feeling. But, less than $200 for this unit makes hoop jumping less stressful, and the unit seems pristine to me.
    When you say hard drive was wiped... which hard drive? More to the point, you didn't mention which model you bought. Did your T100 come with a product activation code for MS Office?

 

 
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